SBCN - North Carolina Community College System Small Business Center Network
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South Piedmont CC Small Business Center
OCH Building A
Monroe

Phone: 704-993-2424
Email: Send

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Your small business isn't small to you.                                        

Every day is a challenge for an existing business owner or those wishing to start their own business.   Learn how to write a business plan and secure startup capital through classes.  Gain knowledge of demographics and regulations in your industry.   


The Small Business Center at South Piedmont Community College (SPCC) offers help with finances, marketing or other day-to-day hurdles of running a company.                                                                                             

Starting a small business is a huge job.

Its hard to know where to start. Click here and learn how to write a business plan and secure startup capital. Gain knowledge of demographics and regulations in your industry.

Small Business Center at South Piedmont Community College (SPCC) offer seminars, resources and free counseling that will jump start your startup.

The objective of the Small Business Center Network (SBCN) is to increase the success rate and the number of viable small businesses in North Carolina by providing high quality, readily accessible assistance to prospective and existing small business owners which will lead to job creation and retention. Our Small Business Center is here to assist you by offering one-on-one confidential business counseling plus workshops and seminars on a variety of business topics. We are a community-based provider of education and training, counseling, networking and referrals. All of our services are free! Let our Small Business Center help you develop a plan of action to turn your dreams into a reality!

South Piedmont Community College's Small Business Center, located in Building A at the Old Charlotte Highway Campus, Monroe, NC and the Lockhart Taylor Center, Wadesboro, NC provides many resources for entrepreneurs and small businesses, including: 

 
  • Free, confidential, one-to-one counseling;
  • Free seminars, workshops and programs on critical aspects of starting a new business and managing a small business;
  • Business plan and feasibility study development;
  • Marketing strategies and tactics;
  • Licensing, permit, and tax requirements;
  • Review and analysis of financial performance;
  • Financing options and opportunities for small businesses; and
  • Resources (books, videos, on-line publications and research tools) to help you successfully start and grow your business



For more information contact:

Lisa L. Rolan, Small Business Center Director
lrolan@spcc.edu
704-993-2424



Online Request for Counseling

Events

Monday, August 28, 2017 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Knowing your customer is a vital part of effectively selling your product or service. This course will introduce you to tools and resources that will help you understand your customer and increase sales. This seminar will provides information to help you understand your customer. Some of the topics covered in this course are: •Researching your customers •Describing your customer •Adjusting your marketing mix The four key objectives are: 1. Identify the questions to ask about buying behavior of your small business customers; 2. Identify different sources of data about your customers; 3. Describe how to use data collected to create a description of your customer, and 4. Describe the kinds of changes you might make to your small business as a result of your research.
Speaker: Kenda McCoy
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Knowing your customer is a vital part of effectively selling your product or service. This course will introduce you to tools and resources that will help you understand your customer and increase sales. This seminar will provides information to help you understand your customer. Some of the topics covered in this course are: •Researching your customers •Describing your customer •Adjusting your marketing mix The four key objectives are: 1. Identify the questions to ask about buying behavior of your small business customers; 2. Identify different sources of data about your customers; 3. Describe how to use data collected to create a description of your customer, and 4. Describe the kinds of changes you might make to your small business as a result of your research.
Speaker: Kenda McCoy
Thursday, September 21, 2017 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Attend this free seminar to hear from a banker in the small business arena. Here are examples of legal issues in which he will touch on: •Types of Loan •Why Credit Matters •What a Banker Looks for in a Business Plan
Speaker: Joe Weidner and Daniel Chizmadia
Monday, September 25, 2017 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Our guest speaker is a small business owner who is an outstanding, dynamic and passionate speaker on the ins and outs of finance, recordkeeping and taxes for your small business. He will be going over and teaching you what you need to do to get ready to file your taxes, what information you need to prepare for year end. If you have accounting, taxes and recordkeeping questions, he is the one who can help give you the answers and make sure your books are in order. What kinds of records should I keep? You may choose any record keeping system suited to your business that clearly shows your income and expenses. Except in a few cases, the law does not require any special kind of records. However, the business you are in affects the type of records you need to keep for federal tax purposes. How long should I keep records? The length of time you should keep a document depends on the action, expense, or event the document records. You must keep your records as long as they may be needed to prove the income or deductions on a tax return. How long should I keep employment tax records? You must keep all of your records as long as they may be needed; however, keep all records of employment taxes for at least four years. How should I record my business transactions? Purchases, sales, payroll, and other transactions you have in your business generate supporting documents. These documents contain information you need to record in your books. What is the burden of proof? The responsibility to prove entries, deductions, and statements made on your tax returns is known as the burden of proof. You must be able to prove (substantiate) certain elements of expenses to deduct them.
Speaker: Tommy Alvis
Tuesday, September 26, 2017 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Every company needs a business plan. Do you have one that accurately communicates your company’s current position, your business goals, your financial requirements and projections as well as other information you will need to build your company and present it to banks, investors, partners, and other teaming prospects. What You Will Learn: • The importance of a written business plan for your business • The components of a business plan, including: business concept, market analysis, industry health and trends, strategic position and consistent business focus, management, employee development and retention, financing, corporate adaptability, values, new opportunities, trends and much more. • How to gather information for your plan and which professional will need to help. The goal for this seminar is for you to leave the seminar with an outline for your business plan and a plan on completing it!! Who Should Attend: If you own your own business or want to own your own business or are responsible for managing the financial and operations aspects of your company, you should attend this seminar. This seminar will introduce you to what you need to know about building a measurable business plan for your business. Make Plans to Attend
Speaker: Al Johnstone
Wednesday, September 27, 2017 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Attention small business owners: the Affordable Health Care Act is complicated and complex. Discover what actions you need to take now to avoid expensive fines in 2017. Learn how to comply with obligations of the act, escape pitfalls and take advantage of potential tax credits. Plan ahead to minimize impacts and to gain full understanding of insurance plan options and employer obligations. Find out if you are compliant with the 10 requirements for the Affordable Care Act in 2017. Preview the 2017 Health Care offerings from local providers including: PLATINUM, GOLD, SILVER and BRONZE PLANS. Making Health Care affordable again with old strategies for a new time. Controlling Costs and Enhancing Value. Make Plans to Attend!!
Speaker: Tim Grismer
Wednesday, September 27, 2017 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM
Simply put, a budget is an itemized summary of likely income and expenses for a given period of time. It helps you determine whether you can grab a bite to eat or should head home for a bowl of soup. It is typically created using a spreadsheet, and it provides a concrete, organized and easily understood breakdown of how much money you have coming in and how much you are letting go. It is an invaluable tool to help you prioritize your spending and manage your money – no matter how much or how little you have. Planning and monitoring your budget will help you identify wasteful expenditures, adapt quickly as your financial situation changes, and achieve your financial goals. When you actually see the breakdown of your expenses, you may be surprised by what you find; this process is essential to fully grasping how things can add up. Creating a budget will decrease your stress levels because, with a budget, there are not surprises. With a budget, you don’t have to panic or wonder if you have the money – you already know. When most business owners hear the word “budgeting,” they cringe. Many times, the “budget” ends up collecting dust on some back room shelf, never to be seen again—until your accountant asks to see it. But your budget is more important than you think. It’s critical in helping you and your management team get the profit you want. Everyone deals with a budget at some point in their life. If it’s important to you that your children go on to college, you’ll figure out a way to make your finances work. If it’s a vacation you really want, you’ll find a way to put money aside. When you have a goal in mind, you’re making intentional financial decisions to support that goal. That’s what’s really important: being intentional. Budgeting in your business is the same thing. Start with the end in mind. If you really want that 15% Operating Profit Return on Revenue, craft a budget that will produce that result. Your budget doesn’t need to be complex or complicated, it simply needs to serve you and your business. Invest in a bookkeeping program if you don't already have one. Using a bookkeeping program will keep your budget and line items organized and give you the ability to easily categorize transactions and build reports. You’ll want your accountant nearby to make sure you have all your financial information accurately represented. With your program in place, you’ll find that assets like your income statement, budget and cash plan, will be more consistent and communicate more information about your business. Start with your Profit and Loss and think about what it costs to actually make a sale. How much money are you spending to produce your product? What about the advertising expenses it took to get that sale? When you break down how much you’re spending to sell your product, you’re actually determining the Cost of Goods. You’ll also want to look at your Fixed Expenses, which are the expenses that don’t change each month. The trick is not looking at the numbers at the end of each line item, but instead, looking at the percentage differences. For example, let’s say you made 10 sales in January, the next month you made 12 sales and the following month you made 15 sales. You might not think this is a notable difference, but when you take a look at the percentages, you’ll see that it’s actually a steady trend in your business. From there, you can take a closer look at your budget and craft it with intention. If you have a 5% steady increase in sales, what can you do to make it a 20% increase? With that knowledge in mind, look at your previous budgets or bills. What can you expect for the future? Make a best guess on changes like: • subtle shifts in the market that may affect sales • new marketing campaigns you have planned to increase sales • productive changes in technology • operational adjustments to increase productivity and gross profit margins • fixed expense increases/decreases, etc. This way, you’re creating a “forecast,” using the data you have from the past to monitor changes for the future. (Tip: Depending on your industry, you may want to take into account the seasonal nature of your business and adjust the budget accordingly.) Crafting a meaningful budget is as much an art as it is a science. It takes massaging the numbers, playing with ideas, and always keeping your eye on where you want to take your business as articulated in your Vision Statement. But it’s worth it! It takes a willingness to search out and find the story in the numbers and to ask the tough questions: • What really affects my Gross Profit Margin? • What are possible action steps we can take in bumping up those margins? • How can we increase productivity? • Am I attracting only the most profitable customers? • Am I settling for whoever happens in my front door? • How can I tweak my marketing so that my ideal customer comes running? • Who is accountable for reviewing fixed expenses? • Do you have a system in place to regularly review these expenses? Make plans to attend now!
Speaker: Lisa L Rolan
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Location

4209 Old Charlotte Hwy
Monroe, NC 28110

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