SBCN - North Carolina Community College System Small Business Center Network
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South Piedmont CC Small Business Center
OCH Building A
Monroe

Phone: 704-993-2424
Email: Send

Web Site

 

Your small business isn't small to you.                                        

Every day is a challenge for an existing business owner or those wishing to start their own business.   Learn how to write a business plan and secure startup capital through classes.  Gain knowledge of demographics and regulations in your industry.   


The Small Business Center at South Piedmont Community College (SPCC) offers help with finances, marketing or other day-to-day hurdles of running a company.                                                                                             

Starting a small business is a huge job.

Its hard to know where to start. Click here and learn how to write a business plan and secure startup capital. Gain knowledge of demographics and regulations in your industry.

Small Business Center at South Piedmont Community College (SPCC) offer seminars, resources and free counseling that will jump start your startup.

The objective of the Small Business Center Network (SBCN) is to increase the success rate and the number of viable small businesses in North Carolina by providing high quality, readily accessible assistance to prospective and existing small business owners which will lead to job creation and retention. Our Small Business Center is here to assist you by offering one-on-one confidential business counseling plus workshops and seminars on a variety of business topics. We are a community-based provider of education and training, counseling, networking and referrals. All of our services are free! Let our Small Business Center help you develop a plan of action to turn your dreams into a reality!

South Piedmont Community College's Small Business Center, located in Building A at the Old Charlotte Highway Campus, Monroe, NC and the Lockhart Taylor Center, Wadesboro, NC provides many resources for entrepreneurs and small businesses, including: 

 
  • Free, confidential, one-to-one counseling;
  • Free seminars, workshops and programs on critical aspects of starting a new business and managing a small business;
  • Business plan and feasibility study development;
  • Marketing strategies and tactics;
  • Licensing, permit, and tax requirements;
  • Review and analysis of financial performance;
  • Financing options and opportunities for small businesses; and
  • Resources (books, videos, on-line publications and research tools) to help you successfully start and grow your business



For more information contact:

Lisa L. Rolan, Small Business Center Director
lrolan@spcc.edu
704-993-2424



Online Request for Counseling

Events

Thursday, August 10, 2017 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Understand the credit reporting system, your credit worthiness, your business needs, just to name a few. Understand your FICO score. Get answers to some of these questions: • What is your track record? • How much is too much? • What is your credit history and how is it established? • What is a healthy mix? • Consumer Reporting • How to increase your personal credit score? Make plans to attend now!
Speaker: Lisa L Rolan
Monday, August 14, 2017 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Understand the credit reporting system, your credit worthiness, your business needs, just to name a few. Understand your FICO score. Get answers to some of these questions: • What is your track record? • How much is too much? • What is your credit history and how is it established? • What is a healthy mix? • Consumer Reporting • How to increase your personal credit score? Make plans to attend now!
Speaker: Lisa L Rolan
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
Stay at the top of your game- Learn the importance of understanding your financials - Learn what your lenders are looking for and how to build your financial story. Understand how to read your Balance Sheet, P&L, & Cash Flow Statements in addition to what transactions make up your financial history.
Speaker: Natalie Williams, Women in Business Center
Monday, August 21, 2017 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Making the most of your small business is easy when you have the right tools and a solid strategy at your disposal. This seminar gives you ideas for putting banking, retirement and insurance tools to work so you can help build and protect your small business according to your short- and long-term goals.
Speaker: Jo Moore,
Tuesday, August 22, 2017 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
The real poverty of typical families is found neither in their low income nor in costly essential expenses but rather in not understanding their own cash flow. What is a cash flow statement and why is it so important? A cash flow statement is part of your business’s financial statements, which include these: An income statement A balance sheet A cash flow statement However, a cash flow statement isn’t just something you prepare and put in a drawer to never look at again. Used correctly, it can be a vital tool for managing your business and planning ahead for financing needs. Ideally, you want to maintain a positive cash flow at all times. This ensures you have the funds available that you need to pay your bills, pay employees, and purchase inventory or assets in a timely fashion. In reality, of course, many businesses find that from time to time, their cash flow is negative. Or perhaps it’s an ongoing problem: You are doing fine on paper in terms of profitability, but somehow find that you frequently run short of cash. Reviewing your cash flow statement regularly can help you spot this type of cyclical pattern in your business and prevent a cash flow emergency. Make plans to attend now!
Speaker: Lisa L Rolan
Wednesday, August 23, 2017 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Comprehensive financial planning for an individual or couple generally involves tax planning, risk management, investment planning, retirement planning and gift and estate planning. For each of these areas, let’s consider how business ownership takes this planning to another level. • Tax Planning: The legal structure chosen for the business – sole proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company (LLC), or a corporation – will determine how the business profits are taxed. As a sole proprietor or single owner of an LLC, your business income is treated the same as your personal income, making tax compliance considerably simpler. Add partners or additional LLC members, and while again the business income flows through to the individual return, it is possible to split the taxable income (and losses) of the business in ways that can benefit multiple owners. S-corporation status can allow business owners to take some distributions of income without paying self-employment taxes, whereas C-corporation status entails separate taxation at the business level, at different rates from what the business owner pays on his personal return. To the extent that individuals and C-corporations have different marginal rates at different brackets of income, it is possible to coordinate the taxation of business and personal income in a way that provides the greatest benefit to both the business and its owner. • Risk Management: Most individuals need to plan for the financial risk of early death, disability, illness and infirmity, and liability or loss related to property ownership. Once an individual owns a business, however, the risks multiply to include: interruption of the business due to a disaster; death or disability of a person key to the success of the business; loss of business property; and lawsuits resulting from negligence or defective products. This last risk can be addressed in part by the legal structure of the business, but the others require specialized insurance coverage over and beyond what the owner holds for himself and his family. If the business has employees, worker’s compensation coverage becomes necessary as well. • Retirement Planning: It’s not uncommon for business owners to assume they will never retire. After all, they’re presumably doing what they love, so why not continue indefinitely? Alternatively, they may see the business as the only retirement plan necessary – as a source of capital that will fund their retirement needs. Thinking along these lines is generally a mistake: If anything, a business owner may need more retirement planning rather than less, to prepare for the time when he no longer can or wishes to work, and/or the business cannot fully provide for his financial needs. The good news is that business ownership affords all sorts of tax-advantaged ways to save for retirement, and the ability to put aside amounts considerably larger than what is permissible to non-business owners. • Investment Planning: Most small businesses are self-financed by their owners, which results in the business becoming the owner’s major or only investment. Even when the owner has extra capital to make other investments, he may still prefer to put his money back into his business, where he feels he has the most control over his returns. Prudent planning nevertheless must be focused on diversification. Asset classes and investments must be carefully selected for the owner’s personal portfolio to offset the concentrated risk he is taking with the business. • Estate Planning: If a small business grows and becomes a valuable asset, simple wills or family trusts set up for personal affairs may no longer suffice for the transfer of the business. More sophisticated financial planning techniques will be necessary to ensure business continuity after death, reduce any estate taxes assessed for the business, and to provide liquidity to heirs to pay those taxes. A reorganization of the business might be advisable to create different types of ownership for family members, and to make full use of IRS-sanctioned discounts in valuing the business for purposes of gift and estate taxes. Insurance trusts and charitable trusts can also play an important role in the efficient transfer of a small business. One point should be clear when it comes to financial planning for the small business owner: the do-it-yourself drive that helped you start your business will not serve you well when it comes to managing the many financial issues created by that business. This is where professional expertise often becomes necessary. Make plans to Attend!!
Speaker: Tommy Alvis
Thursday, August 24, 2017 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM
The real poverty of typical businesses is found neither in their low income nor in costly essential expenses but rather in not understanding their own cash flow. What is a cash flow statement and why is it so important? A cash flow statement is part of your business’s financial statements, which include these: An income statement A balance sheet A cash flow statement However, a cash flow statement isn’t just something you prepare and put in a drawer to never look at again. Used correctly, it can be a vital tool for managing your business and planning ahead for financing needs. Ideally, you want to maintain a positive cash flow at all times. This ensures you have the funds available that you need to pay your bills, pay employees, and purchase inventory or assets in a timely fashion. In reality, of course, many businesses find that from time to time, their cash flow is negative. Or perhaps it’s an ongoing problem: You are doing fine on paper in terms of profitability, but somehow find that you frequently run short of cash. Reviewing your cash flow statement regularly can help you spot this type of cyclical pattern in your business and prevent a cash flow emergency. Make plans to attend now!
Speaker: Lisa L Rolan
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Location

4209 Old Charlotte Hwy
Monroe, NC 28110

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